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Asia

Travelogues has access to Remote Lands’ tireless experts, travel writers around the globe, and a unique range of contacts at the top of the industry. But, it’s our readers and users that actually get to go to all of these amazing places and do all of these incredible things while we’re stuck in the office.

Asia is coming alive, especially in North Asia where the blossoms are budding and the snows are melting away to reveal temples and mountains in the warm winds of March. Spring is in swing.

Pushkar, India

“Pushkar, which lies in the Ajmer district of Rajasthan, is known for its Camel Fair,” Carol Foote tells Travelogues. “The beautiful town is centered around a holy lake which attracts thousands of pilgrims to bathe in the holy waters and worship in the Brahma Mandir, one of the world’s few Brahma Temples.”

Carole says that the accompanying photograph is of a local villager who makes her living by tempting tourists with her handmade jewelry. “Pushkar is really a photographer’s paradise – the Rajasthani women provide such a vibrant backdrop to the arid desert and the muted tones of the ancient buildings of the town, images that will stay in my memory forever,” Carole says. “Pushkar also attracts its fair share of tourists who come to study meditation or yoga or just to roam the ancient streets, browse the handicraft shops, and while away the time in the cafes watching the colorful parade of life which constantly passes by.”

Carole, a favorite of ours at Remote Lands, states that visitors can also go on a camel ride to watch the sun go down over the desert, complete with musicians, dancers, and a cup of masala tea.

The City Palace of Udaipur, India

“What struck me about the shot was the fact that the guy was a gaurd for this room; the room was so beautiful – the color and the light – and yet he appeared to be trapped there like a prisoner in a guilded cage,” Lester and Sue Woodward relayed to Travelogues. 

The City Palace was built in 1553, over 400 years ago, with a combination of Rajasthani and Mughal architectural styles steeped in history. Today, it is well known as the City Palace Museum, a maze of passages full of art galleries, sculptures, and rooms. Also complimenting the City Palace is spectacular panoramic view of the city.

The Forbidden City, China

We ended our short time in Beijing with a visit to the Forbidden City, which was easily done before an early afternoon flight to our next destination. Our guide, Crystal, was extremely knowledgeable and pointed out all of the details of this must-see attraction in China,” luxury travel advisor Kaleigh Kirkpatrick tells Travelogues regarding her journey to the Forbidden City in Beijing. “I especially loved learning about the ‘Dragon Lady’ who ruled China from behind the scenes for almost 50 years while the successors to the throne were being groomed for the position.”

“Remote Lands’ planning was perfectly thought out, and the guides and drivers executed each detail flawlessly,” Kaleigh says. In response, the disembodied voice of Remote Lands has responded, “Aw, shucks.”

Bagan, Myanmar

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“This place is magical. Even with mass tourism and fleets of tour buses it’s still possible to find yourself alone,” Jared Skidmore tells Travelogues.

Bagan is an ancient city located in central Myanmar. With more than 2,200 temples in an area of over 104 square kilometers, Bagan is one of Myanmar’s most popular attractions. Among the most popular experiences for Bagan is the hot air balloon ride over the region.

“I conquered my fears when I decided to go on top of the temple; though my knees were shaking, with the help of my friends I did it. I will never forget this experience. What a mind can erase, in a picture it will stay,” Ice Dimayuga told Travelogues. 

This traveler decided to take on four countries: Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, and climbed the pictured temple in Myanmar.

Myanmar recently decided to ban temple climbing to maintain the integrity of the structures, as well as being possibly dangerous to travelers.

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Seoul, South Korea

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“I actually went to see the architecture of Dongdaemun Design Plaza and came by this amazing LED garden by accident,” Jakob Dahl tells Travelogues. “It should have been a temporary exhibition, but to my luck it had become permanent; this gave me the chance to grab my camera and get this shot.”

The DDP LED Rose Garden permanent exhibition of roses lights up automatically when the sun sets, located next to Dongdaemun Design Plaza. It first began as a special exhibition on National Liberation Day in 2015 as a celebration, then it became popular among tourists and locals alike and became permanent. There are more than 25,000 roses planted on the grounds, an impressive and romantic sight in Seoul.

More #TakeMeToRemoteLands Favorites from March